Monday, March 12, 2018

spring and sprang


I woke up about 8:30 yesterday and almost jumped out of bed until I remembered that it was Sunday and also that it was really, sunwise, only 7:30. We sprang forward for DST. Lot's of grumbling on FB but I like it. I'm not an early riser, rarely see the sun rise, so I'd rather have an extra hour of daylight in the evening and yes I do know it's not an actual extra hour.

Saturday, my sister and I went to the Fort Bend County Master Gardener's vegetable and herb sale where I got some tomatoes and a few other things, not too much as I'm not ready to plant that yet, not til later this week, and then to a nursery nearby where I got a new plumbago because I don't know if the one I had has survived, no sign of it yet, and a pretty little yellow flowered oxalis with copper leaves, and a guara since I pulled the last one out after it got 5' tall and had still never bloomed and an early birthday present from my sister, an unusual azalea that the owner called a 'butterfly azalea' but which the tag called Koromo Shikibu. 


I looked it up and it was originally from Japan and is so fragrant. My sister had also given me a bag of amaryllis bulbs earlier and some comfrey that she had dug up and I had some small volunteers from another plant and some cuttings I needed to repot for the annual garden club plant sale and so I puttered around in the yard most the day because it was a cool overcast day and perfect for planting the new things and digging stuff up to move into pots and cutting the damaged foliage off the leatherleaf ferns that are coming out which got pretty well trampled while the structure of the house was being repaired and had plenty more stuff to do like pull more evening primrose out of the flower beds where they just have taken over 


and dig up more of the mexican petunias but it started drizzling and then the wind picked up so I came in.

The wildflower mini-meadow exploded with bluebonnets and what I think is the yellow flowering clasp leaved coneflower but if so it is the most vigorous I've ever seen it but it's not blooming yet so I don't know for sure and those two are so thick as to smother anything else that might have come up, like the queen anne's lace which isn't even showing up on the roadsides yet so maybe it's too early.


We are going to have poppies soon though.


More pictures...

I did nothing to this picture besides crop it. These azaleas are just that vibrant.


bletilla

fringe flower...I posted this tree previously but it is just outstanding this year so here it is again

spirea in full bloom

the red climbing rose, always a bit behind the pink

the dewberry (our wild blackberry) loved the flood and cold and looks like we will have a big crop






8 comments:

  1. Your azaleas look just like mine. So beautiful. And I love your new butterfly azalea. I've never seen one. I'll be on the lookout.
    I am so grateful you gave me the common name of the Loropetalum as I can never remember that but I can probably remember "fringe flower."

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    1. I wish you could smell it. heady perfume.

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  2. I am impressed you know all those names. They won't stick for me.
    I planted a helleborus that Ruth gave me. We put it in the ground before we went to Wisconsin for Christmas, and I believe it's made it.

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  3. Holding my breath...spring must be on its way!!!

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  4. Must not plant until May. Must not plant until May. (Just reminding myself because your pictures always make me so eager! Although yesterday's snow was reminder enough...)

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  5. That's one good thing about wild, native plants -- they're incredibly durable! Your flowers and plants are already so far along. I love the butterfly azalea -- leave it to the Japanese to hybridize something so simple and elegant.

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  6. I'm jealous. When I woke this morning, the rooftops and grounds had ice on them. Okay, frost. Whatever.

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  7. Color! I have promised myself that I will redo flower beds this year to fill them with plants that are hardy and provide color, harder in our climate but I'm determined to get help to make it happen. In the meantime, your photos are my background today as the snow piles up.

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