Wednesday, June 11, 2014

the last week

We arrived in the city for our last week working in the old shop and our last week living in the old house. I am finishing up the last two panels this week, installed the ones we finished the last two weeks and Marc might begin to dismantle the air system.

He's also tackled the front yard with a weed eater since it is totally overgrown with weeds and the little bit of grass that grows there. The Boy and Wife quickly lost interest in maintaining the yard and since one of the first things they did was remove the leaf mulch and wedelia ground cover I had in the front and dumped it all in the even smaller back yard, the weeds and wild seeds dropped by the birds found ample room to grow.

They did no maintenance in the back at all and it is thigh high with wedelia, lantana, mist flower, bridal veil wandering jew, and Japanese hydrangeas, especially after all the rain we got two weeks ago. The mulberry tree that volunteered by the back corner of the shop has grown unrestrained for two years after I cut down the sapling. But I had a wonderful surprise when we got in this afternoon.


When I was unlocking the back door I happened to look into the back yard and saw this:


Once I waded through the overgrowth, I saw more flowers.  I've never planted a passion flower vine back there so I guess it is a gift from a bird.  A last gift. If I can find where it's planted, I might try to dig it up.


13 comments:

  1. What a gorgeous flower. I hope you trace it to its source.

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  2. Ooh my...that is simply beautiful! What a going away present.

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  3. how beautiful. a sweet send-off.

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  4. Passionflower is so otherworldly, isn't it? I'll never forget the first time I saw one- growing wild in an orange grove. I swear, I thought it came from another planet.

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  5. You should see the area where I stop mowing. It became a tall grass prairie pretty quick. I leave the back 80 like that, even adding some seeds and plants.

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  6. You should see the area where I stop mowing. It became a tall grass prairie pretty quick. I leave the back 80 like that, even adding some seeds and plants.

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  7. Too bad the practice of bringing in a herd of goats isn't common. They brought goats in to eat the underbrush by Congressional Cemetery last year. They were so cute and by god they cleared out everything. They even ate the poison ivy which they say is not a problem for goats.

    Next best: Mark with a weed whacker.

    This is a big rite of passage for you, Ellen. It's all for the good but this is big. I'm sending a lot of supportive love in your direction, just because I feel like it.

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  8. WHAT!!! THAt flower is a real thing!! WOW! There is some serious undergrowth going on there to be sure! I would be reluctant to disturb it, must house many small animals...snakes...bugs...and fairies. Good luck, dearest, on your new turned page! Sending love!

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  9. Wow! That IS quite an overgrowth. The bright spot is that I bet it provides a haven for lots of little critters. (Well, up until now, anyway. :) )

    Good luck tracing that vine back to its roots! Our neighbors in Florida have a passionflower vine and it's always pretty. They do kind of take over, though.

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  10. Lovely! I love those kinds of surprises...

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  11. Wow! Beauty among the "thorns" so to speak. I thought of your backyard as I was planting annuals in beds around my daughter's house as she lists it for sale...no jungle to deal with but even getting it to look presentable has taken time and effort. Hope the passion flower is portable.

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I opened my big mouth, now it's your turn.