Friday, August 13, 2010

fabrication and installation




This job was three panels to be installed in front of the existing glass in the windows in the master bedroom. The client chose a contemporary design using texture and tone as opposed to a lot of fancy carving.

After the full size drawings were done I cut the stencils and applied the etching cream to the appropriate areas. Next I recovered those areas and Marc did the sandblasting. The last step was to adhere the bevels and textured glass pieces which had been cut and the edges ground to insure a close fit and maintain the straight or curving lines.

I had intended to document the laminating (I prefer that term to 'gluing') of the bevels, clear textured glass and glass nuggets a little more completely. As usual, I took a few pictures either before I began work or after and once actually working on the panels, I totally forgot about taking pictures.


The first step is to cover the sandblasted areas to protect it from the glue. These one inch peak bevels will be glued down in the open space.


I use an optically clear glass to glass UV setting adhesive. This row of bevels has been set and cleaned.


The granite textured glass and a row of peak bevels have been applied, set and cleaned up on the center panel. The space for the dicroic blue glass is set up and the area for the thin reeded textured glass is exposed.


The left hand panel with the dicroic and granite circle and the clear glass nuggets already applied and the area for the thin reeded exposed and surrounding etched areas protected.


Preparing the thin reeded glass to be laminated on.

It took three long days in the shop to get all the pieces glued on. It took a previous three days to cut, edge and in the case of the nuggets and granite textured glass, to flatten the backs. Not all textured glass is completely flat on the backside and if it is too wavy, the tension of the glue will cause it to crack about a day later and let me tell you, getting a piece of cracked glass off after it's been set is a nasty and labor intensive process. Basically you have to soak the area in a solvent and chip away at it using a single edge razor blade and a hammer all the while hoping you aren't going to break the base piece of glass.

Yesterday was the installation for these three panels.


The three panels laying on the floor waiting to be set in their openings.


Two of the three installed. The third opening is just out of sight on the left. This picture is washed out, because light expands. What you see in person is totally overwhelmed with light in the picture.


The center panel. Once I zoomed in, the panels showed up nicely.


The right hand panel. The left hand panel is a mirror image of this one.

The installation was interrupted because the installer had to go and take some measurements on another job. He returned later to finish up but I did not. I may go back later and get more pictures.




19 comments:

  1. I always think of you as being an artist. But there is a lot of technology here!

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  2. Those are absolutely lovely.

    Pearl

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  3. What a process this is! Your & Marc's work is beautiful. I love your free flowing designs.

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  4. You are amazing. I want my own house and lotsa' money so you can come and do all my windows.

    Wow!

    SkippyMom

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  5. What a 'window' into your craft!

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  6. I so want them for my home. Do you travel?

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  7. Absolutely stunning Ellen. How talented you are!

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  8. Everything has already been said - I wish we lived on the same Continent!

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  9. OH WOW breathtaking! LOVE the complex subtlety of your windows- Would love to live in glass house of your making!

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  10. You are art and talent amaze me!

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  11. Exquisite work. So much labour to produce such fine and delicate results.

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  12. Stunning. Fascinating. Your work speaks for itself.

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  13. Gorgeous and mesmerizing, and more so seeing your arduous process.

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  14. thank you everyone for all your lovely comments.

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  15. Oh my gosh! It is gorgeous!!
    My large piece will be installed this coming Saturday. Yeah!!!!
    And the best part...I get paid! LOL!!
    Congrats on a successful installation.
    Hugs
    SueAnn

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  16. The quality of these graphics is exceptional I think, and a wonderful craft to let them really live. Thanks for sharing.

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